Home Seller Checklist

Home Seller Checklist

Thinking of selling your home this year? Maybe you are ready to upsize or downsize, move to a new neighborhood, or take advantage of a sellers’ market. In any case, there are some smart moves you can make before you list to ease the process of selling your home.

  • Bring in a handyman. Have repairs made to leaky faucets, torn screens, broken door or window locks and handles, faulty electrical outlets, drywall damage, missing grout or caulking, broken sprinkler heads, rotten wood and anything else that would give a buyer reason to wonder, “What else is wrong with this house?”
  • Clean out storage spaces. Closet by closet, cabinet by cabinet, and drawer by drawer, get rid of items you no longer use. Your goal should be to show that the home has plenty of storage space, not spaces bursting with clutter.
  • Put away excess décor. Go for a minimalist look so that buyers can see the bones of the house and not have to move or look around decorative items to see the home.
  • Ditto on the Family Photographs. Humans are naturally drawn to people’s faces. If your home has family photos on every wall and shelf, buyers will be distracted by all the pretty faces.
  • Have the exterior pressure-cleaned. Make sure to include the roof, patios, porches,  driveway and walkways.
  • Spruce up the landscaping. First impressions are everything. You want buyers to want to come inside and not drive on by. Increase your curb appeal by trimming shrubbery and trees, putting down fresh mulch and planting some annuals.
  • Perform a deep cleaning. Consider hiring professional cleaners to tackle everything from the ceiling fans to the baseboards, including cleaning inside and behind kitchen appliances, the dryer vent, and inside cabinets and drawers.
  • Put on a fresh coat of paint. At least touch up scuff marks, but if your home is painted in bold or dark colors, consider repainting to neutral shades.
  • Check for smells. We become immune to smells we are around every day. Consider having someone come in to check for odors from pets, mildew, mold or smoke.
  • Have a WDO inspection performed. This is usually a part of the buyer’s inspection process, but if you can identify any past or present termite activity and have it corrected ahead of time, you can breathe easier come inspection time.
  • Ditto for mold testing. If you have any reason to believe there may be mold or water damage lurking behind walls, under flooring or in the attic, go ahead and address it now.
  • Consider staging. If you have a rooms that are sparsely furnished or were used for a purpose other than what they were built for, consider refurnishing or staging to show how furniture lays out in the room.
  • Contact one of our agents! For more information on selling your home, please request our Home Seller’s Guide and check out our page dedicated to selling. I would love the opportunity to talk with you about your plans.

6 Things to Know About Selling Your Home Alone

If you are planning to sell your home in the near future, you may be considering selling “By Owner.” The idea of saving the money you might spend on brokers’ commissions is attractive. After all, who wouldn’t want to have a few thousand more dollars to spend on their new home? However, selling your home […]

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Questions You Should Ask When Buying New Construction

There’s nothing like moving into a home that is truly new, with no smells, smudges or dust left behind by a previous owner. Even better is when you get to make your own custom selections. But buying from a builder is a different ball game and it’s important you know how to play. Consider these […]

The post Questions You Should Ask When Buying New Construction appeared first on Cassidy R. Smith.

Signs of Damage in a House

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It’s so easy to get distracted by the cute barn doors, the recessed lighting, and the ship-lap walls – that we miss the water damage on the roof! Luckily, the inspection period is written in the contract to give buyers a chance to hire an inspector to assess the property. However, it’s important to know the signs that something may be wrong before getting too invested in a home. Here are some signs that there may be big problems with a house.

Signs of roof damage:

  • Cupped, curled or warped shingles
  • Lots of shingle granules in the gutters
  • Cracked or broken tiles
  • Missing sections
  • Mismatched roof sections
  • Ceiling stains
  • Sagging roof deck

Signs of foundation damage:

  • Visible cracks in exterior or interior
  • Door jams/doors not shutting
  • Gaps on top of doors when closed
  • Windows not square
  • Wall corners not square
  • Cracks in driveway or sidewalks
  • Drainage not pointing away from the house
  • Large trees with roots close to foundation

Signs of water/mold damage:

  • Water stains on ceilings and walls
  • Cracks around windows
  • Bowed roof
  • Visible mold
  • Musty smell
  • Missing caulking or tile in baths
  • No bathroom vents
  • Wood rot around doors and trim
  • Peeling paint

Signs of electrical damage:

  • Exposed wires
  • Warm outlets
  • Damaged or rusted electric panel

Signs of plumbing damage:

  • Water stains in sinks, toilets, bath
  • Low water pressure
  • Screeching when turning on/off
  • Slow drains
  • Bad odors from sinks

A good real estate agent will be able to help you catch these things. Ready to start looking for homes? Contact one of our awesome agents today and get started!

Avoid Emotional Decision Making When Falling in Love with a Home

Avoid Emotional Decision Making When Falling in Love With a Home

Every home buyer hopes to find the perfect house. The one that, as soon as you walk through the front door, you know it is the one for you.

It happens, and when it does, I am really happy for my buyers. I always want my buyers to fall in love with the perfect house and live happily ever after.

Just like in relationships, however, emotions often come into play during the home buying journey…Emotions that may result in some not-so-loving feelings.

While I’m not a therapist, I can help you talk through your emotions about the homes we visit and help you identify if you are making decisions with your heart and not your head.

There are six basic emotions; let’s look at how they can affect your decision-making skills.

Fear: We have all learned that fear triggers a “fight or flight” response. In terms of making decisions, fear may cause you to “flee” from making any decision at all, which could make your home buying experience exhausting. If you are afraid you will run out of time, or that if you pass on a house you won’t find another one, you may “fight” by making a rash decision too quickly.

Sadness: Feeling sad can cause you to lower your expectations and settle for less than you truly want. You may decide you don’t need certain features that you previously wanted. Or you may settle for one of the first homes you see instead of persevering with the search.

Disgust: Disgust can cause you to eliminate choices that otherwise might have been in the running. You might find the perfect floor plan, style, or location, but if the home has a bad odor, a filthy floor, or some other off-putting defect, you might not be able to stomach it, even if it is a completely reversible problem.

Surprise: Surprise is an emotion that is fleeting– it happens quickly and then subsides. Surprises can be pleasant, like if you go to see a home you were not expecting to like and find it is much nicer than you expected. But if you are touring the home and a rat runs out of the pantry, you get a negative surprise. While surprise doesn’t last, the memory does, and it can influence how you feel about the event.

Happiness: We all want to feel happy when buying a home but be careful that your excitement doesn’t cause you to make bad decisions. When you are happy or excited, you tend to underestimate risks, assuming everything will work out. People also tend to spend more money than they planned when super excited.

Anger: Anger can also cause you to take bigger risks. Research shows angry people are more likely to make impulsive decisions. Anger can sometimes be helpful. If handled properly, anger can help you to identify your needs and outline action steps to get the information you need to act responsibly.

So, first let’s find a home to take a look at!  Go to our Home Search page and use our tools to find some options to choose from.